One of the most powerful actions you can take is to put up a Vote Climatehouse sign. Email Vote Climate to find out more. You can collect from Northcote if you are in Melbourne, or print your own using this file. 

These three are from various groups in Darebin. You can collect from Northcote if you are in Melbourne - email Vote Climate for the address. Or use these to print your own.

Lower house guides

The most important thing to remember when voting in the House of Representatives is that YOU MUST NUMBER EVERY BOX or your vote will be invalid. Vote Climate is not doing seat by seat lower house comparisons this election, but there are are number of helpful guides you can rely on.

Vote Climate One have rated every candidate in every seat, using a traffic light system based on published policies and a questionnaire. Find your electorate here.

Vote Earth Now have also rated the candidates from every lower house electorate, providing total scores based on past voting record and a questionnaire.  Find your electorate here

In several key electorates there are climate action independents standing local groups have done scorecards. For example, in Josh Frydenberg's electorate, where he is under challenge from climate independent, Monique Ryan and Piers Mitchem from The Greens,  local group, Kooyong Votes Climate have a produced a handy guide. Find their scorecard here.

Some of the Labor/Liberals marginals, Liberal/Greens marginals and Labor/Greens marginals also have local scorecards.

Have a look at the local group climate guides for Victorian lower house seats here. You can also download and print the lower house climate guides for these Victorian electorates here or go to the local group website via the links below:
Chisholm
Cooper
Higgins
Jaga Jaga
Flinders (coming soon) 
Kooyong

Menzies
McEwan
Wills (coming soon)

In the Senate vote for more than six above the line

Under the new Senate voting system, you must number six or more boxes if voting above the line (and 12 or more if voting below the line). That is the minimum legal requirement, but it is far, far better to number as many boxes as possible until you get to the last few that are all as bad as each other.

In each state, there are six seats, so quite commonly two go to Labor, two go to the Coalition and one goes to the Greens. Who wins that sixth seat is occasionally determined by a small  number of votes, and yet that Senator could end up as part of the balance of power! If you have just numbered six boxes above the line, and all your preferred candidates have been eliminated by the time the final place is decided, you will have no say over who wins that last place.

It's important to number all the 'less bad' options as well as the best options. 

Senate guides 

We have done a detailed guide to the Senate only for Victoria, but many of the minor parties are the same from state to state, so it can provide some guidance for other states as well. 

Scroll down below the Victorian detailed guide for quick guides for Victoria and the other states. These are handy to print out and take to the polling booth. Guides for ACT and Northern Territory are coming soon.

Want to print one of our Senate guides? The files are here.

You can also check the ratings of the senate candidates at Vote Climate One or Vote Earth Now. These guides use somewhat different methodologies to Vote Climate as they rely partly on unpublished questionnaires, while we rely only on published policies. However, these other sites come to very similar conclusions about which parties and candidates to recommend.

The main difference is in how parties that have no climate policies (like Federal ICAC Now! or Legalise Cannabis) are rated. Vote Climate uses a separate category for the parties with no policies, but where there are indications that they may support action on climate. These parties clearly prioritise issues other than climate, but it is still worth numbering them above the parties and candidates that actively work against climate action.